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Indexes to Probate Records

Images of Wake County Wills, Estates, Guardianships 1771 to 1782

Testators: Abbot, William, estate ;Alford, James, estate ;Allen, Young ;Alston, Hines, bond ;Atkins, John Jr. ;Aycock, Richard ;Babb, William ;Barbee, Christopher ;Barbee, Micajah, estate ;Barker, Joel ;Bass, Charles, petition ;Beddingfield, William ;Bell orphans ;Bell, Robert ;Belvins, Robert, estate ;Bird, Edmund ;Bird, Joab ;Blake, Benjamin, estate ;Blake, Joseph, estate ;Blake, John, estate ;Bohannon, Robert ;Bunch, Paul ;Cannon, John ;Cardin, William, estate ;Carter, George, apprentice ;Chaves, Paul, free negro, apprentice ;Cheves, Thomas Sr. ;Childers, James, prisoner ;Colbert, Nicholas, estate ;Conner, Terrence, orphan ;Dempster, John ;Dempster, John, bond ;Duck, Timothy of the Militia ;Dunn, John ;Earp, Edward ;Ferrells, Thomas, estate ;Flynt, David ;Griffin, Hardy, apprentice ;Guffey, John, estate ;Hall, John ;Hardy, Benjamin ;Harrell, Jesse, poor child ;Harriss, Daniel ;Harves, John ;High, John ;High, Michael, estate ;High, Likey and Moses Sugg, deed ;Hill, Sion ;Hines, Thomas, sheriff bond ;Hood, Thomas ;Joiner, Moses ;Jones, James ;Jones, Thomas ;Jones, Willis ;Kennedy, Francis ;Kimbrough, Nathaniel ;Lane, Barnabas, estate ;Lane, Joel ;Lankford, Benjamin, estate ;Lingo, Levin ;Louis, Arthur, base-born child ;Martin, Gibson ;Martin, James ;Mays, John ;McGuffey, John ;Mickleroy, Catherine, estate ;Mobley, Edward ;Mobley, William, estate ;Monk, Elizabeth ;Monk, Willis ;Monk, Willis, estate ;Moore, William ;Oliver, Ailcey ;Oliver, James, apprentice ;Orr, John ;Orr, Robert ;Pool, George ;Rand, John ;Reach, Jeremiah ;Rice, Joseph, orphan ;Rigsby, James, deed ;Rogers, Job ;Rogers, John ;Rogers, Michael, estate ;Runnells, Sherard ;Simmons, Willis ;Skinner, John, estate ;Slimmon, George ;Speight, Abigail ;Speight, William ;Streater, John, orphan ;Strickland, Sampson ;Tate, James ;Tate, orphan ;Taylor, Roland, estate ;Tedder, Solomon, apprentice ;Thomas, Francis, estate ;Townly, Elizabeth, bond ;Tucker, Edward ;Turner, Simon ;Wiggins, David ;Woodard, John ;Wootten, Thomas, sheriff

North Carolina Executive Mansion

North Carolina Executive MansionThe 40-room North Carolina Executive mansion in Raleigh was designed by Samuel Sloan and was constructed between 1883 and 1891 at its location on 200 North Blount Street in Raleigh. It is said that the red bricks were fashioned by State prisoners and made from native clay. The interior of the mansion features crystal chandeliers, 18th and 19th century furnishings and hand-loomed rugs. The three-storied residence was first occupied by Daniel G. Fowle in 1891. It had a patterned high-hipped roof with steep, intersecting gables, a small rectangular cupola and verandahs and balconies with ornate brackets and trim.

Wake County North Carolina Probate records available to members of North Carolina Pioneers

Images of Wake County Wills, Estates, Guardianships 1788 to 1794

Testators: Atkins, John; Ball, Thomas, estate; Barns, homas; Bird, orphans of Edmund; Black, Josiah; Bledsoe, Aaron, estate; Bradley, Dennis; Brasfield, John; Bugg, Celia, apprentice; Butler, James; Carloss, John, estate; Cole, Henry; Collins, Andrew; Collins, Dennis; Collins, Margaret, estate; Cumming, William, estate; Daniel, Woodson; Davis, Humphrey; Davis, Joseph; Dawson, Isaac; Dobey, John, petition of insolvency; Dodd, Thomas, estate; Earp, Cullen Ballinger, orphan; Earp, Edmund, estate; Earp, Emmanuel, estate; Ellis, Alsey, apprentice ; Ellis, Griffin ; Ellis, John, apprentice; Fallow, James, estate ; Ferrell, Rebecca, estate ; Field, Mary, estate; Flint orphans; Flynt, Langford, estate; Gates, Robert; Geer, Martha; Gill, David; Goodwin, John; Green, Edward; Green, William; Hamilton, William; Harrard, William, apprentice; Harriss, John, petition; Harris, Mary, orphans of, apprenticed; Hartsfield, Richard power of attorney to Andrew Hartsfield; Hays, Gilbert, estate; Hendon, James; Hendrick, William; Hendry, Reuben, apprentice; High, Amelia; Hill, Isaac; Hillsman, James, estate ; Hinton, John Sr.; Horton, David ; Hunter, Jesse; Hutchins, Jno Sr.; Joiner, Moses, estate ; Jones, Albridgton; Jones, James, deed ; Jordan, George, estate ; Jordan, James ; Kennedy, Francis, estate; Kimbrough, Nathaniel, estate; King, Drury ; Lee, Ludwell, apprentice; Lett, John, apprentice ; Little, William, estate; Major, William; Mann, John, estate; Martin, Paul, petition of insolvency; Massey, John release to Henry Warren; McCollister, Garland ; Mills, Bethiah; Mobley, Mordecai; Nutt, Robert, estate ; Nutt, Robert ; Peebles, John; Pendey, Aaron Read ; Pope, Barnaby, estate; Pope, Burwell, apprentice; Pope, Joab, apprentice ; Previtt William; Proctor, Reuben to David Lowry ; Reeves, William, apprentice ; Rench, John; Rench, Joseph, estate; Revil, Barbara, apprentice ; Ridley, Elizabeth, petition for dower ; Ridley, William, estate; Rogers, Ephraim, apprentice; Sawyer, Joseph, estate ; Simmons, Dianah; Simms, Isham ; Spain, Joshua, estate; Stogdell, Mary, orphan ; Stogden, John, apprentice; Strait, David ; Strickland, Lot ; Strickland, Sampson, estate; Tate, James, estate; Thomas, John Giles; Tipp, James, estate; Tipper, James, estate ; Tucker, Daniel; Tucker, Elizabeth, orphan ; Weaver, Alexander, apprentice; Weaver, Edey; Weaver, Zadock; Wilson, Anne, apprentice; Woodward, Christopher ; Worldrope, James, estate; Wright, John, ; Yarbrough, John

Names of Families in Wake County Wills, Estates, Guardianships

Battle of Morrisville Wake County was formed in 1771 from parts of Cumberland, Johnston and Orange Counties. The first court house was built at a village originally called Wake Courthouse, now known as Bloomsbury. In 1771, the first elections and court were held, and the first militia units were organized. Later on, in 1787 parts of Wake County were included in Franklin County, and in 1881, part went to Durham County. The county was named after Margaret Wake, the wife of colonial Governor William Tryon. Raleigh was established in 1791 on 1,000 acres of land and was named after Sir Walter Raleigh. During the colonial period, the State capitol was located in New Bern. Later, Raleigh became the capitol. The Battle at Morrisville Station was fought on April 13 to 15, 1865 in Morrisville, North Carolina during the War Between the States. It was the last official battle between the armies of Major General William T. Sherman and General Joseph E. Johnston. General Judson Kilpatrick, commanding officer of the Union cavalry advance, compelled Confederate forces under the command of Generals Wade Hampton III and Joseph Wheeler to withdraw in haste. They had been frantically trying to transport their remaining supplies and wounded by rail westward toward the final Confederate encampment in Greensboro, North Carolina. Kilpatrick used artillery on the heights overlooking Morrisville Station and cavalry charges to push the Confederates out of the small village leaving many needed supplies behind. However, the trains were able to withdraw with wounded from the Battle of Bentonville and the Battle of Averasboro. Later, General Johnston sent a courier to the Federal encampments at Morrisville with a message for Major General Sherman requesting a conference to discuss an armistice. Several days later the two generals met at Bennett Place near Durham on April 17, 1865 to begin discussing the terms of what would become the largest surrender of the war.